The Generalist

A product manager should ideally be a generalist. Yes, some specialization is required, but in what area? Statistical analysis of research data so you can draw better conclusions? System architecture so your feature specifications make more practical sense? Front-end programming so engineers don’t rebel against you? Graphic design so you …

Writing Rig

The book business is undergoing a revolution – not only in the way books are produced (electronically) and published (by the authors themselves), but also in the way books are written in the first place. I’d like to describe the “writing rig” I’m using to write my book, a method …

Knowers vs. Askers

Knowers talk.  Askers listen. Knowers have the answer.  Askers question. Knowers know everything.  Askers learn about everything. Knowers try to impress.  Askers try to impress knowledge on their brain. Knowers are stubborn.  Askers are persistent. Knowers are complicated.  Askers are simple. Knowers grow to become grumpy old people.  Askers keep …

Domain Expertise – a Must?

A common hiring mistake is to insist on finding someone who has significant domain experience. While such a hire – if one can be found at all – has its merits, the drawbacks often outweigh the advantages. The common belief, to paraphrase an old meme, is “no one was ever fired for hiring a candidate with domain expertise”. Hiring managers think they play it safe by ignoring “foreign” candidates whose career path did not cross their specific domain. To their defense I can say that it is, indeed, easier to vet candidates who have domain-specific keywords on their resume. It just feels right. But is taking the easy route the right way to go?